Thursday 30th May 2024
  • What to Know About Starting Your Career Remotely - Harvard Business Review (No paywall)

    Remote work can be a blessing and curse for those just starting their careers. While it has clear benefits (improved work-life balance, geographic flexibility, and eliminating commutes), it’s not without drawbacks. There are unique challenges that come with starting your career remotely: isolation, distractions, and communication gaps. Fortunately, you can overcome these obstacle. Here’s how. Isolation: You can eliminate or reduce isolation by visiting a coworking space or a coffee shop, joining a club or intramural sports team, or working from a friend or family member’s house. Distractions: Distractions can be avoided by establishing boundaries with those around you and adjusting your environment. You might also try using a dedicated workspace, removing entertainment systems from that space. Communication gaps: Working remotely limits communication to Slack messages, video meetings, or phone calls. To limit communication gaps, take notes, get clear directions, and review similar past projects for reference.

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  • Why You Should Be Tracking Customer Surplus Value - Harvard Business Review (No paywall)

    How much value are your customers getting from your products? Net Promoter Scores are one tool to answer that question but the authors offer another: Customer Surplus Value. The idea, drawn from economics, is to ask customers how much money they’d need to be given to give up your product for a period of time. The more money it would take for them to accept, the more valuable the product. An experiment at LinkedIn shows how this measure complements NPS scores as a way of measuring customer satisfaction.

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  • New Concentrating Solar Tower Is Worth Its Salt with 24/7 Power - Scientific American (No paywall)

    A California firm is converting sunlight to heat and storing it in molten salt so it can supply electricity when the wind is calm or the sun isn’t shining

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  • Nudge Users to Catch Generative AI Errors

    The spring 2024 issue’s special report looks at how to take advantage of market opportunities in the digital space, and provides advice on building culture and friendships at work; maximizing the benefits of LLMs, corporate venture capital initiatives, and innovation contests; and scaling automation and digital health platform.

    The spring 2024 issue’s special report looks at how to take advantage of market opportunities in the digital space, and provides advice on building culture and friendships at work; maximizing the benefits of LLMs, corporate venture capital initiatives, and innovation contests; and scaling automation and digital health platform.

    OpenAI’s ChatGPT has generated excitement since its release in November 2022, but it has also created new challenges for managers. On the one hand, business leaders understand that they cannot afford to overlook the potential of generative AI large language models (LLMs). On the other hand, apprehensions surrounding issues such as bias, inaccuracy, and security breaches loom large, limiting trust in these models.

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  • This New Map Of Gene Regulation Could Change The Way We See The Human Brain

    A project to map the gene regulation responsible for brain development takes some big first steps.

    The pathology of mental disorders is complex. Researchers can’t just attribute mental disorders to one or a few single mutations in a gene or protein — there are too many factors at play. After all, some 98 percent of the human genome is composed of DNA segments that are important for regulating other genes. To pin down the interplay between these genes and mental disorders, a consortium funded by the National Institute of Mental Health are making a map. In a series of new papers, the researchers outlined genes and regulatory elements that control the brain’s pathways — crucial steps toward finding out how genes contribute to mental health disorders.

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  • 28 Years Later, The Most Influential Batman Story Will Finally Be Finished

    There are many iconic on-screen versions of Batman, and there are a plethora of comic book stories that have inspired them. In 1996 and ‘97, a limited comic book series shaped the Christopher Nolan Dark Knight trilogy, as well as aspects of the Robert Pattinson-led The Batman. Now, 28 years after it was first published, this influential Batman story — The Long Halloween — will get a sequel series called The Last Halloween. Almost three decades after the tale began, one of the best Batman stories of all time will finally come to a close.

    On May 25, DC Comics revealed that a new 10-part comic series called Batman The Long Halloween: The Last Halloween, will release its first issue on September 28, 2024. According to IGN, the series will be written by Jeff Loeb, who wrote The Long Halloween (1996) and its sequel Dark Victory (1999). Sadly, the artist responsible for the haunting look of The Long Halloween, Tim Sale, passed in 2022. Instead, as IGN reports, The Last Halloween will be illustrated “by a rotating team of artists working in tribute to Sale.”

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  • Porsche's First Hybrid 911 Has Tons of Speed -- But Tesla's Model S Plaid Still Wins

    Porsche is dipping its toes even further into electrification. The automaker’s new 911 sports car will be the first-ever hybrid version of its famed sports car, and maybe one of the most appealing hybrid EVs we’ve seen yet.

    Even before this hybrid 911, Porsche has been steadily electrifying its portfolio with hybrid and all-electric vehicles. Outside the fully electric Taycan and more recent Macan Electric, Porsche’s lineup includes the Cayenne E-Hybrid and the Panamera Turbo E-Hybrid. We might still be a ways out from an all-electric take on Porsche’s classic sports car, but at least we’re getting a hybrid version to hold us over.

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  • 'Knives Out 3' Might Finally Take on Its Biggest Rival Franchise

    Rian Johnson had lofty post-Last-Jedi plans, and he made them happen. Even though his potential Star Wars trilogy is still in limbo, his passion projects have received acclaim. While his Peacock detective series Poker Face is gearing up for Season 2, his Netflix mystery movie series that began with Knives Out is teasing a third movie, and the newly announced title is teasing a shift in genre, a shift that should place it squarely against another murder-mystery labor of love.

    Netflix recently announced the third movie in the Knives Out universe will be titled Wake Up, Dead Man. While we don’t know any specific details of the plot, recent breakout movie stars Cailee Spaeny and Josh O’Connor will star opposite Daniel Craig, once again reprising his role as the drawling detective Benoit Blanc. Check out the full title reveal video below.

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  • PS Plus Is Finally Bringing Back Its Most Requested Feature

    Sony has announced the return of its Days of Play promotion, a monthlong celebration that brings sales, game catalog additions, and more. While there’s a lot in the PS Blog post, the real big deal here is the addition of PS2 games in the Classics Catalog, something fans have been pining for since the creation of the new PS Plus. It’s a watershed moment that could open the door to countless other titles, and it hopefully, shows that Sony is trying to be more thoughtful about its back catalog from past systems.

    This isn’t actually the first time Sony has re-released PS2 titles, as the company put out a selection of 21 “classics” in 2018 and 2019, but unceremoniously stopped. These PS2-emulated games were playable on PS4, and then could be played on PS5 after its release. But that means Sony hadn’t put out any more PS2 games since before the launch of the PS5, and the relaunch of PS Plus’ tier system.

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  • This Big Study Found A Sleep Aid Hiding In Plain Sight

    The secret to great sleep might be easier than we thought — if you have the appetite for it. A recent study in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition explores a link between fruit and vegetable intake and sleep duration, with not-so-shocking results. There might be a new sleep aid for us all — and you can find it at the supermarket.

    The paper looked at data from over 5,000 adults in Finland who recorded their sleep and dietary habits in a questionnaire. The authors, a team of public health scientists from the University of Helsinki, National Institute for Health and Welfare, and Turku University of Applied Sciences, observed that not only did plentiful produce consumption impact sleep, but so did the types of fruits and vegetables consumed.

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