Saturday 10th December 2022
  • Couples That Work: How Dual-Career Couples Can Thrive in Love and Work ^ 10258

    Finding fulfillment in both love and work isn't easy--but it's possible. The majority of couples today are dual-career couples. As anyone who's part of such a relationship knows, this presents big challenges: trying to raise kids and achieve career goals while caring for and supporting your partner can seem impossible. Yet most advice for dual-career couples fails, framing the challenges as a zero-sum game in which one partner's gain is the other's loss and solutions feel like sacrifices or unsatisfactory trade-offs. This book is different. In "Couples That Work," INSEAD professor Jennifer Petriglieri rejects conventional, one-size-fits-all solutions and instead focuses on how dual-career couples can tackle and resolve the challenges they face throughout their lives--together. She identifies three key phases of exploration and personal growth in every couple's work-life journey, showing how partners must navigate these together to strengthen their bond. Each phase is crystallized with a question: How can we make this work?: The first phase focuses on the logistics of combining two busy lives and often involves the demands of young children; What do we really want?: In the second phase, couples learn to navigate their midlife crises in ways that allow each partner to continue to feel happy and fulfilled; Who are we now?: With careers winding down and kids grown up, this last phase offers new freedoms--and uncertainties. Based on a five-year research project, the book includes interviews with couples from over thirty countries--from executives to entrepreneurs and from twentysomething newlyweds to dual-career grandparents. Filled with vivid real-life stories, keen insights, and engaging exercises, "Couples That Work" will help couples develop their own unique answers to that most pressing question: How can we successfully combine love and work?

    Continued here

  • Carvajal, S.A.: Building on a Century of Business Growth and Family Values ^ KEL872

    This case presents the history and recent governance challenges of Carvajal, S.A., a Colombia-based, family-owned, billion-dollar-plus holding company that had offered printing-related (e.g., Yellow Pages, notebooks) and other products and services across and beyond South America for more than a century. Specifically, the case details the company's state of affairs in early 2011, a time by which Carvajal's flagship businesses had matured rapidly with the emergence of digital technology and diminished demand for paper/print-based products. Though profits and growth remained positive, Carvajal's leaders knew that upholding the business's legacy of returns, dividends for all family members, and extensive philanthropy would take significant strategy and execution. Compounding the strategy issues, Carvajal faced these market challenges with new leadership: the first non-family CEO since the company's inception. Well-established Colombian executive Ricardo Obregon had been hired in 2008 over two family candidates to lead the business. Obregon was to oversee a complex governance network that included a holding company with seven operating companies, their management and respective boards, a family council, and 280 members (including spouses) of a shareholding family in its sixth generation. Carvajal's business and family leaders had to face market issues and decisions that included the possibility of taking public the operating companies and/or the holding company while maintaining the business's long traditions of unity, respect, strong ethics, and philanthropy. That meant optimizing several crucial relationships: between the family and the new CEO; between the family and the board; between the operating companies and the holding company; and between members of the large Carvajal family, many of whom now resided outside of Colombia and Latin America.

    Continued here

  • Rob Parson at Morgan Stanley (C) ^ 498056

    Teach this case online with new suggestions added to the Teaching Note.A year after Rob Parson's manager decided to postpone Parson's promotion, Parson's new manager Gary Stuart faces the decision of promotion again. Stuart considers whether the efforts Parson had made were sufficient. Teaching purpose: To explore managerial problems associated with performance appraisal and performance management.

    Continued here

  • Name Your Price: Compensation Negotiation at Whole Health Management (B) ^ 908065

    Buy books, tools, case studies, and articles on leadership, strategy, innovation, and other business and management topics

    Continued here

  • Harvard Business Essentials: Coaching and Mentoring: How to Develop Top Talent and Achieve Stronger Performance ^ 435X

    Effective managers know that timely coaching can dramatically enhance their teams' performance. Coaching and Mentoring offers managers comprehensive advice on how to help employees grow professionally and achieve their goals. This volume covers the full spectrum of effective mentoring and the nuts and bolts of coaching. Managers learn how to master special mentoring challenges, improve listening skills, and provide ongoing support to their employees. The Harvard Business Essentials series is designed to provide comprehensive advice, personal coaching, background information, and guidance on the most relevant topics in business. Drawing on rich content from Harvard Business School Publishing and other sources, these concise guides are carefully crafted to provide a highly practical resource for readers with all levels of experience and are especially valuable for the new manager. To assure quality and accuracy, a specialized content adviser from a world-class business school closely reviews each volume. Whether you are a new manager seeking to expand your skills or a seasoned professional looking to broaden your knowledge base, these solution-oriented books put reliable answers at your fingertips.

    Continued here

  • And Now The Hard Part: Role-Plays ^ UV1076

    "The diversity lady has a label on her forehead and talks about the standard message," one senior executive at a large corporation said. "It's the same message we got 20 years ago. We do it annually but employees never get any of that. I've never had a diversity talk to my staff." Traditional diversity initiatives generally focus on specific dimensions of difference such as gender, race, sexual orientation, able-bodiedness, or religion. This material involves role-plays among a diverse group of players that encourage inclusion of a broader scope of social-identity differences such as diversity of problem-solving styles and emotional intelligence differences.

    Continued here

  • Major Steckleson at the National Training Center (A) ^ 404089

    Major Steckleson is facing his toughest challenge yet. As an experienced observer-controller at the U.S. Army's National Training Center, Steckleson is responsible for helping leaders of the 3rd Armored Cavalry Squadron learn from a deadly mistake in simulated combat by facilitating the unit's After Action Review (AAR). AARs are structured conversations about recent experience designed to help units learn from both mistakes and successes.

    Continued here

  • The Family Council: Organization and Function ^ IES455

    The way a family council is organized and how it works depends on a series of factors: the council's degree of development, whether a family constitution exists, which generations are involved, whether the family council is in the initial stages, or whether, on the contrary, there is already a set schedule for meetings and an existing track record, the characteristics of the family and its specific scope (a council made up of parents and children is not the same as one between brothers, or among cousins, including uncles, etc.), whether the council members are also members of the Board of Directors, etc. The reasons for the existence of the family council and its functions may be dictated by the family constitution. The family constitution incorporates the principles and criteria used in the family governance system to deal with personal issues and family matters that should be managed by the family council. The specific aspects are different for each particular family.

    Continued here

  • Generation to Generation: Life Cycles of the Family Business ^ 555X

    Presents one of the first comprehensive overviews of family business as a specific organizational form. Focusing on the inevitable maturing of families and their firms over time, the authors reveal the dynamics and challenges family businesses face as they move through their life cycles. The book asks questions, such as: What is the difference between an entrepreneurial start-up and a family business, and how does one become the other? How does the meaning of the business to the family change as adults and children age? Ho do families move through generational changes in leadership, from anticipation to transfer, and then separation and retirement? This book is divided into three sections that present a multidimensional model of a family business. The authors use the model to explore the various stages in the family business life span and extract generalizable lessons about how family businesses should be organized.

    Continued here

  • Corporate Responsibility & Community Engagement at the Tintaya Copper Mine (A) ^ 506023

    Located in the highlands of Peru, the Tintaya copper mine has long been a source of intense conflict between local community members and mine operators. The mine, which was owned and managed first by the Peruvian state and later by BHP Billiton, stands on 2,300 hectares of land expropriated from local subsistence farmers. In 2000, to contest this loss of land, mining-related environmental degradation, and allegations of human rights abuses, a coalition of five indigenous communities forged an alliance with a group of domestic and international NGOs to build their case against the BHP Billiton and pursue it directly with the company's Australian headquarters. The outcome of these efforts was the inception of a unique corporate-community negotiation process known as the Tintaya Dialogue Table. In December 2004, after three years of negotiation, BHP Billiton and the five communities signed an agreement compensating families for lost land and livelihoods and establishing a local environmental monitoring team and community development fund. However, just as the company resolves one conflict, another group of local stakeholders emerges with new demands--ones that the company may not be able to meet. The conflict with this new group culminates in a violent takeover of the mine in May 2005, whereupon BHP Billiton staff are forced to shut down operations, abandon the mine site, and devise a new strategy for winning back local support.

    Continued here