Wednesday 21st August 2019
  • Why "Tell Them Something They Don't Know" Is Bad Advice in B2B Sales


    Few people in sales would dispute the importance of bringing insights to customer conversations. One might call this the Jane Austen rule of selling: a seller in possession of a desired prospect must be in want of a relevant insight. Or as one executive says to sellers who call on him: "Your job isn't to ask me what keeps me up at night. It's to tell me what should be."

    Over the years, we've observed many salespeople who successfully make developing and delivering meaningful insights a core part of their approach. Their experience and our research indicate that, at a minimum, you need to do more than "tell people something they don't know." That approach can lead you to develop irrelevant factoids. Instead, we suggest crafting a strategy based on whom you're talking to and where you are in the sales cycle.

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  • Are you sleeping enough? This infographic shows how you compare to the rest of the world


    Sleep quality, patterns, and duration may vary among countries, but one thing's clear - people still aren't getting enough sleep. While some people can function on a few hours, others find themselves reaching for that second cup of morning coffee instead of getting those extra Z's.

    Today's graphic comes from Raconteur and highlights some startling takeaways from the 2019 Philips Global Sleep Survey, answered by over 11,000 adults from 12 countries.

    Let's settle in to discover what impacts our sleeping habits, also known as sleep hygiene, and what helps people sleep better and longer.

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  • 3 Questions Hiring Managers Want You to Answer


    Interviews have an outsize influence on whether you land the job you want. Even though your application materials reflect your lifetime of experience, a few hours of interaction with a recruiting team often ends up being the determining factor in whether you actually get hired. So, clearly you need to stand out.

    To do that, it helps to be mindful of what recruiters and hiring managers are trying to accomplish with the interview and prepare accordingly. Below are three of the questions they want answered and advice on how to address them.

    "What will it be like to work with you?"
    People can't know from your resume or cover letter what it will be like to have you work for them.

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  • How algorithms shape our world


    We live in a world run by algorithms, computer programs that make decisions or solve problems for us. In this riveting, funny talk, Kevin Slavin shows how modern algorithms determine stock prices, espionage tactics, even the movies you watch. But, he asks: If we depend on complex algorithms to manage our daily decisions -- when do we start to lose control?

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  • Has this scientist finally found the fountain of youth?


    The black mouse on the screen sprawls on its belly, back hunched, blinking but otherwise motionless. Its organs are failing. It appears to be days away from death. It has progeria, a disease of accelerated aging, caused by a genetic mutation. It is only three months old.

    I am in the laboratory of Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, a Spaniard who works at the Gene Expression Laboratory at San Diego's Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and who next shows me something hard to believe. It's the same mouse, lively and active, after being treated with an age-reversal mixture. "It completely rejuvenates," Izpisua Belmonte tells me with a mischievous grin. "If you look inside, obviously, all the organs, all the cells are younger."

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  • 3 ways to measure your adaptability- and how to improve it


    I met 273 start-up founders last year. And each one was looking for money. As a tech investor, my goal was to sort through everyone that I met and make a quick determination about which ones had the potential to make something really big.

    But what makes a great founder? This is a question I ask myself daily. Some venture capitalists place bets based on a founder's previous background. Did they go to an Ivy League school? Have they worked at a blue-chip company? Have they built out a big vision before? Effectively, how smart is this person?

    Other VCs asses a founder's emotional quotient, or EQ. How well will this person build teams and build rapport across customers and clients?

    I have a different methodology to assess start-up founders, though, and it's not complicated. I look for signs of one specific trait. Not IQ, not EQ. It's adaptability: how well a person reacts to the inevitability of change, and lots of it. That's the single most important determinant for me. I subscribe to the belief that adaptability itself is a form of intelligence, and our adaptability quotient, or AQ, is something that can be measured, tested and improved.

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  • 5 Bad Habits of Absolutely Ineffective Programmers


    Some programmers are better than others. In fact, there's a statistical distribution: a few are absolutely brilliant, some are good, most are at least competent, some are barely competent and a few are truly dire.

    That said, the difference between a good programmer and a bad one is not necessarily coding skill. In fact, it is something even more basic; bad habits. And bad habits are hard to break both in life and at work.

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  • Your voice could be a clue to your health


    Evolution has bestowed on humans a unique combination of bone, muscle and cartilage to give us exquisite control over the sounds we make, from secretive whispers to belting arias. Our voices allow us to express a vast range of thought and feeling. But they also offer clues to the inner workings of our bodies.

    Researchers at the Universidad Politechnica de Madrid, Johns Hopkins University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe that we may be able to use the voice to diagnose Parkinson's disease, an illness that is notoriously difficult to detect. Neither lab tests nor brain imaging can definitively identify it at present, but since the disease disrupts all of the body’s motor systems, it may often be discernible in speech. These scientists are analysing the range of sound frequencies that patients produce to see whether the changes that Parkinson's causes in our muscles also affect how subjects talk. They have developed a technique that, they claim, can identify nearly 90% of previously diagnosed Parkinson's sufferers, more accurate than any other single test.

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  • Cities and Ambition


    Great cities attract ambitious people. You can sense it when you walk around one. In a hundred subtle ways, the city sends you a message: you could do more; you should try harder.

    The surprising thing is how different these messages can be. New York tells you, above all: you should make more money. There are other messages too, of course. You should be hipper. You should be better looking. But the clearest message is that you should be richer.

    What I like about Boston (or rather Cambridge) is that the message there is: you should be smarter. You really should get around to reading all those books you've been meaning to.

    When you ask what message a city sends, you sometimes get surprising answers. As much as they respect brains in Silicon Valley, the message the Valley sends is: you should be more powerful.

    That's not quite the same message New York sends. Power matters in New York too of course, but New York is pretty impressed by a billion dollars even if you merely inherited it. In Silicon Valley no one would care except a few real estate agents. What matters in Silicon Valley is how much effect you have on the world. The reason people there care about Larry and Sergey is not their wealth but the fact that they control Google, which affects practically everyone.

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  • The Spacing Effect: How to Improve Learning and Maximize Retention


    Even outside of formal education, we have to learn large amounts of new information on a regular basis: foreign languages, technical terms, sale scripts, speeches, the names of coworkers. Learning through rote memorization is tedious and - more importantly - ineffective. If we want to remember something, we need to work with our brains, not against them. To do that, we need to understand cognitive constraints and find intelligent ways to get around them or use them to our advantage.

    This is where the spacing effect comes in. It's a wildly useful phenomenon: we are better able to recall information and concepts if we learn them in multiple, spread-out sessions. We can leverage this effect by using spaced repetition to slowly learn almost anything.

    The most basic problem with traditional networking events is that they are mixing bowls for professionals who are there for different reasons.

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