Thursday 24th January 2019
  • Our children's career aspirations have nothing in common with the jobs of the future - WEF


    Much of the discussion in Davos this week will focus on technology and jobs. But what will the Fourth Industrial Revolution mean for our children and the way we educate them? How do the jobs they aspire to and the skills and knowledge they are acquiring relate to the jobs we think we will need? They are of course the workforce of our future and key to the success of this revolution.
    New analysis by the charity Education and Employers examines the career aspirations of young people in the UK aged 7-11 and 17-18 and maps these against projected labour market demand

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  • The shocking truth about inequality today - WEF


    Every January I get a glimpse into a different world. A world of billionaires, of business and political elites, coming together in the Swiss mountain resort of Davos for the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum.
    Curious friends often ask if I have ever met a billionaire and what they are like. I tell them they were born lucky. Lucky to be born a man - 9 out of 10 billionaires are men; lucky to be born into a wealthy family - a third of billionaire fortune is the result of inheritance, lucky to get a decent education in a world where 262 million children don't go to school.
    For Oxfam, Davos is an opportunity to take stock of the crisis of extreme inequality.
    Our inequality reports have charted the rise and rise of the lucky few over recent years. Our latest report, "Private Wealth or Public Goods," shows that the wealth of the world's billionaires increased by twelve percent or $2.5 billion a day last year. A new billionaire was created every two days between 2017 and 2018.
    Meanwhile, the poorest half of humanity, 3.8 billion people, saw their wealth shrink by eleven percent. Just under half the world's population subsists on less than $5.50 a day - one school fee or medical bill away from falling into extreme poverty.

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  • The irresistible attraction of passive income and the actual truth behind it - Sinem Gunel


    Passive income, otherwise called recurring income, is highly desired nowadays.
    While in earlier years passive income itself for private persons probably only seemed possible through investments, for example on the stock exchange, in 2019 you can easily build a passive income stream if you have a proper internet connection.
    There is a worldwide rising community of aspiring people doing business from their laptops and living their lives on their own terms because -- well because they can.
    And in fact, I would consider myself as one of those people who are dreaming of passive income streams and working on my laptop while being completely location independent.
    Of course, the desire for a passive income stream might have many different backgrounds. While some might simply want to be independent and don't obey to the rules of a boss, others might be trying to build an additional income stream to support their families or to be able to save more.

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  • There's only one thing office employees really need for "wellness" - Quartz


    Two business professors in Paris have proposed a radical theory for improving wellness at work.
    They ask: Rather than pour more money into a $50 billion dollar, still-unproven corporate wellness industry concerned with what people do in their off-hours to counteract the effects of their jobs, why not look at the pressures that make those wellness programs so attractive--or necessary--in the first place?
    Instead of inviting employees to find calm at a sanctioned yoga class, or an expensive retreat, why not ease the work-related burdens that are leading to burnout, anxiety, and disease?

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  • Why Should You Learn Artificial Intelligence Like A Maniac? - Yogesh Malik


    It looks as if a day cannot go by without a new story warning that artificial intelligence is coming for our jobs or artificial intelligence will change the face of humanity. If you want to be part of this radical transformation you do not need to wait for your professor/manager/mentor to tell you to learn artificial intelligence. It is the skill of the century. This article broadly touches why one should learn artificial intelligence and different methods and learning frameworks that I have personally applied to my learning.

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  • What the next 20 years will mean for jobs- and how to prepare - WEF


    The next two decades promise a full-scale revolution in our working lives. Before we look into the next 20 years, let's take a quick look at the present - and something once considered paradoxical. We're already living in an age of a lot of robots - and a lot of jobs. As the number of robots at work has reached record levels, it's worth noting that in 2018 the global unemployment level fell to 5.2%, according to a report last month - the lowest level in 38 years. In other words, high tech and high employment don't have to be mutually exclusive. We're living the proof of that today. Given this synchronicity between employment and tech, I believe there are reasons to be hopeful that jobs will become more accessible, more flexible and more liberating over the next two decades.

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  • How to Set Goals That You Can Actually Complete - Ravi Shankar Rajan


    Psychologist John Lee Dumas doesn't mince words when it comes to the idea of setting goals. Dumas says so many people see goal-setting as a roadblock: "They say, 'I don't know how to choose the goal I'm going to focus on because there are so many things and so many choices. How do I decide or know if I'm working on the RIGHT goal?'"
    The key, he says, is to follow a process that helps define your goal in a concrete way and guides you toward taking the steps to make it a reality.

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  • The best way to stay fit changes as you age - Quartz


    The effect of exercise on health is profound. It can protect you from a range of conditions, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. But the type and amount of exercise you should do changes as you age. To ensure that you are doing the right type of exercise for your age, follow this simple guide.

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  • Why I Want to Escape the Rat Race - Mathew Kent


    Lately I've been fascinated with the habits and routines of elite performers. I've been reading about them in books like Daily Rituals by Mason Curry, Tools of Titans, and Tribe of Mentors by Tim Ferriss, and Rest by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang. As you'd expect, there are probably as many different paths to success as there are people on Earth. One piece of good news is that you can succeed your way, even if no one has done it that way before. But despite all the variation that exists, there are themes that often pop up. One of them is the importance of forming a daily routine:

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