Saturday 13th August 2022
  • The Great Attrition is making hiring harder. Are you searching the right talent pools?

    It’s the quitting trend that just won’t quit. People are switching jobs and industries, moving from traditional to nontraditional roles, retiring early, or starting their own businesses. They are taking a time-out to tend to their personal lives or embarking on sabbaticals. The Great Attrition has become the Great Renegotiation.

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  • Great Leaders Are Thoughtful and Deliberate, Not Impulsive and Reactive

    All leaders have two selves. There’s the self we prefer to present to the world – the one that is run by our pre-frontal cortex and is measured, rational, and capable of making deliberate choices. And then there’s the self, run by the amygdala, that is reactive and impulsive and often causes us to fail to meet our commitments or overreact in frustration. The antidote to reacting from the second self is to develop the capacity to observe your two selves in real time. You can start by noticing and labeling your negative emotions such as impatience, frustration, and anger – to get distance from them. Also, watch out for times when you feel you’re digging in your heels. The absolute conviction that you’re right and the compulsion to take action are both strong indicators that you‘re operating from that second self. Finally, it’s important to ask yourself two key questions in challenging moments: “What else could be true here?” and “What is my responsibility in this?” Questioning your conclusions offsets confirmation bias and looking for your responsibility helps you focus on what you can change – your behavior.

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  • Why the Old Elite Spend So Much Time at Work

    Everything in America is getting older these days. In practically every field of human endeavor—politics, business, academia, science, sports, pop culture—the average age of achievement and power is rising.

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  • The hidden makers of Costco's Kirkland Signature and Trader Joe's O's

    Store brands are shrouded in secrecy. Who makes them?

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  • To break unhealthy habits, stop obsessing over willpower – two behavioral scientists explain why routines matter more than conscious choices

    Understanding and changing the environment in which habits form is a critical step when it comes to breaking unwanted behaviors and forming healthy ones.

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  • The 85% Rule for Learning - Scott H Young

    In many situations we find that there is a sweet spot in which training is neither too easy nor too hard, and where learning progresses most quickly. […] For all of these stochastic gradient-descent based learning algorithms, we find that the optimal error rate for training is around 15.87% or, conversely, that the optimal training accuracy is about 85%.

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  • The town with the cleanest air in the world

    The air around me crackles with diamond-like dust with every breath. It is cold, but clear on this mountainside, in the midst of what is essentially an Arctic desert. The extremely dry, freezing air almost instantly turns the fog of moisture from my mouth and nose into tiny, sparkling crystals of ice.

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  • How Scientists Are Using Cake to Share Their Research

    I first noticed the #BakeYourResearch phenomenon when I saw a photo of an incredibly gorgeous bûche de Noël on Twitter. It wasn’t posted by a professional baker, but a mycologist, who’d crafted hyper-realistic mushrooms growing out of the log-shaped cake.

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  • Life and Death and More Life: Leo Tolstoy on Science, Spirituality, and Our Search for Meaning

    Normally people (myself included) who recognize the spiritual life as the basis of life deny the reality, the necessity, the importance of studying the physical life, which evidently cannot lead to any conclusive results. In just the same way, those who only recognize the physical life completely deny the spiritual life and all deductions based on it - deny, as they say, metaphysics. But it is now absolutely clear to me that both are wrong, and both forms of knowledge - the materialistic and the metaphysical - have their own great importance, if only one doesn't wish to make inappropriate deductions from the one or the other.

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  • The CEO View: Defending a Good Company from Bad Investors

    David Pyott had been the CEO of Allergan for nearly 17 years in April 2014, when Valeant Pharmaceuticals and Pershing Square Capital Management initiated the hostile takeover bid described in the accompanying article “The Error at the Heart of Corporate Leadership.” He was the company’s sole representative during the takeover discussions. When it became clear that the bid could not be fended off indefinitely, Pyott, with his board’s blessing, negotiated a deal whereby Allergan would be acquired by Actavis (a company whose business model, like Allergan’s, was growth oriented).

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