Tuesday 9th August 2022
  • The CEO View: Defending a Good Company from Bad Investors

    David Pyott had been the CEO of Allergan for nearly 17 years in April 2014, when Valeant Pharmaceuticals and Pershing Square Capital Management initiated the hostile takeover bid described in the accompanying article “The Error at the Heart of Corporate Leadership.” He was the company’s sole representative during the takeover discussions. When it became clear that the bid could not be fended off indefinitely, Pyott, with his board’s blessing, negotiated a deal whereby Allergan would be acquired by Actavis (a company whose business model, like Allergan’s, was growth oriented).

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  • Is Your Company Squandering Digital Opportunities?

    Many companies today fail to see the threats and opportunities that new digital technologies represent. They fail to recognize that customers are increasingly being drawn to data-driven services and experiences, and they fail to appreciate the growing value of data and digital ecosystems for their business. Five traps in particular create this digital myopia: the product trap, the value-chain trap, the operational-efficiency trap, the customer trap, and the competitor trap. The author discusses each, along with ways to avoid them.

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  • Are You Too Responsible?

    Do you often pay attention to the needs of others but neglect your own? Do you frequently remind others what needs to be done and get annoyed by how irresponsible they seem? Or say “yes” to most things you’re asked to do but then feel resentful? If something goes wrong, do you feel the entire weight of that outcome? If so, these could be signs that you have an overactive sense of responsibility. Over-responsibility can be a hard habit to break. Helping others makes us feel good: We feel competent, reduce our stress, and avoid conflict. This habit also gets reinforced by those around you, who learn to depend on you. But don’t wait until you feel burned out and resentful. In this piece, the author offers practical strategies to find a more appropriate balance of responsibility.

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  • What is a carbon footprint -- and how to measure yours

    As awareness of climate change grows, so does the desire to do something about it. But the scale of the problems it causes—from wildfires to melting glaciers to droughts—can seem utterly overwhelming. It can be hard to make a connection between our everyday lives and the survival of polar bears, let alone how we as individuals can help turn the situation around.

    One way to gain a quantifiable understanding of the impacts of our actions, for good and bad, is through what is known as a carbon footprint. But while the concept is gaining traction - Googling "How do I reduce my carbon footprint?" yields almost 27 million responses - it is not always fully understood.

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  • The Scientific Underpinnings and Impacts of Shame

    People who feel shame readily are at risk for depression and anxiety disorders.

    We have all felt shame at one time or another. Maybe we were teased for mispronouncing a common word or for how we looked in a bathing suit, or perhaps a loved one witnessed us telling a lie. Shame is the uncomfortable sensation we feel in the pit of our stomach when it seems we have no safe haven from the judging gaze of others. We feel small and bad about ourselves and wish we could vanish. Although shame is a universal emotion, how it affects mental health and behavior is not self-evident. Researchers have made good progress in addressing that question.

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  • Have Scientists Been Wrong About Alzheimer’s for Decades?

    A talk with Nobel laureate Thomas C. Südhof about a scandal rocking the world of Alzheimer’s research and how conceptions of the disease are changing.

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  • How Much Protein Do You Actually Need?

    When it comes to basic nutrition, there’s arguably no more important building block than protein. Protein, most people know, is essential for repairing and rebuilding muscle tissue, but it also serves other crucial purposes. You need protein to make organs and skin. You need protein to produce hair, blood, and connective tissue. Protein produces enzymes and neurotransmitters. It also keeps your immune system in top shape.

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  • How to Stay Cool When You’re Put on the Spot

    Work is full of difficult moments where people catch you off guard and make you feel defensive. It’s hard to predict when they’ll occur and how they’ll play out, but you can prepare for them. The author presents a four-step framework to give you an opportunity to respond thoughtfully and confidently in these high-stakes moments. First, take a moment to focus your mind after the initial shock. Second, question your assumptions. Third, depersonalize the interaction, and focus on what’s getting in the way. Finally, close the interaction with confidence.

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  • What Turtles Can Teach Humans About the Science of Slow Aging

    There are three ways to die: of injury, disease, or old age. Over time, humans have gotten better at avoiding the first two, but as we get older, senescence—the gradual deterioration of bodily functions with age—is inevitable. Some species seem to do better than others, though: Take the hydra, a tiny freshwater creature that some scientists have deemed potentially immortal. Last year, a naked mole rat made headlines for turning 39, five times the typical lifespan for similarly sized rodents. And just a few months ago, a giant Aldabra tortoise named Jonathan celebrated what was believed to be his 190th birthday, making him the world’s oldest living land animal.

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  • Paradox Mindset: The Source of Remarkable Creativity in Teams

    “The experience was magical. I had enjoyed collaborative work before, but this was something different,” said Daniel Kahneman of the beginnings of his years-long partnership with fellow psychologist Amos Tversky that culminated in a Nobel Prize in economic sciences three decades later.

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