Saturday 26th May 2018
  • The Art of Having No Idea- Laurence Shorter


    When I sit at my desk trying to be creative, thinking about what to do next - I just get more and more frustrated until I find myself in a tiny hole where everything is dark and I can hear my voice echoing off the sides of my empty tea cup saying "I'll get there! I'll get there!" and nothing else. It never does get anywhere. So instead I have to find ways to forget about myself, and then at some point, unpredictably, something good happens. This paradox is what lies at the heart of all creative work, all innovation and all value that is ever created. At some point you have to accept that you have no idea. Then something may arrive.

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  • Manage your energy, not your time- Tony Schwartz, Catherine McCarthy


    Steve Wanner is a highly respected 37-year-old partner at Ernst & Young, married with four young children. A year ago, he was working 12- to 14-hour days, felt perpetually exhausted, and found it difficult to fully engage with his family in the evenings, which left him feeling guilty and dissatisfied. He slept poorly, made no time to exercise, and seldom ate healthy meals, instead grabbing a bite to eat on the run or while working at his desk. Wanner’s experience is not uncommon. Most of us respond to rising demands in the workplace by putting in longer hours, which inevitably take a toll on us physically, mentally, and emotionally. That leads to declining levels of engagement, increasing levels of distraction, high turnover rates, and soaring medical costs among employees. The Energy Project has worked with thousands of leaders and managers in the course of doing consulting and coaching at large organizations during the past five years. With remarkable consistency, these executives say they’re pushing themselves harder than ever to keep up and increasingly feel they are at a breaking point. The core problem with working longer hours is that time is a finite resource. Energy is a different story. Defined in physics as the capacity to work, energy comes from four main wellsprings in human beings: the body, emotions, mind, and spirit. In each, energy can be systematically expanded and regularly renewed by establishing specific rituals - behaviors that are intentionally practiced and precisely scheduled, with the goal of making them unconscious and automatic as quickly as possible.

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  • Instead of focusing on mass mobility that consumes huge amount of subsidy, the focus should shift towards two-wheelers: Sohinder Gill, CEO, Hero Electric


    Sohinder Gill, CEO of Hero Electric and director-corporate affairs at the Society of Manufacturers of Electric Vehicles, says in an interview with TradeBriefs that India needs a clear road map for the future of Electric Vehicles. Also, instead of mass mobility the focus should be two-wheelers to draw the components industry to the fore. Excerpts:

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  • We expect the shift to electric to be led by the mass mobility segment followed by personal mobility: Mahesh Babu, CEO, Mahindra Electric


    Cost differentials between EV and conventional vehicles are expected to be plugged by 2022-25, while battery costs will halve during this period, leading to early adoption of Electric Vehicles, Mahesh Babu, CEO of Mahindra Electric says in an interview with TradeBriefs. Excerpts:

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  • From Zero to 500 crores in 5 years, the story of 1- India Family Mart


    1. Please tell us about 1-India Family Mart, who is the target customer? Which categories do you operate in?

    1-India Family Mart was established with a vision of providing fresh and affordable fashion and general merchandise to its customers. It is a Value Retail Chain operating in category B, C and D towns.
    The company began operations in 2013 and established its first store in UP and soon expanded operations across Bihar, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab and the North East. Today, 1-India Family Mart has 51 stores across East and North of India. The company plans to open 50 more stores by the end of the current financial year. 1 India Family Mart is founded by Jay Prakash Shukla and Ravinder Singh.

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  • The Irrational User: 8 cognitive biases to keep in mind when building products- Alvin Hsia


    The human mind is a wonderfully complex thinking machine. We've developed written language, built skyscrapers, and discovered quantum physics through our collective ability to plan and reason. But despite our intellect and like all earthly creatures, the mental circuitry of our biological ancestors had been optimized by evolution for a world where timeliness was more valuable than accuracy. Optimizations often present tradeoffs. In many modern decision-making contexts, humans are predictably irrational. Many studies have empirically demonstrated these types of systematic deviations, which are also known as cognitive biases or mental fallacies. Neuroscience researchers have shown that cognitive bias is deeply rooted in the structure of our brains; unlikely to go away for a very, very long time. So whether you consider it a bug or a feature, cognitive bias is part of what makes us human.

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  • Preparing for Giving and Receiving Feedback: A Guide to Doing it Right- Marty Kaplan


    I ought to know better by now...for what it's worth I've got a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from a well-recognized institution, I've been teaching this stuff for decades, and I'm thought of as a straight shooter, yet I've screwed up giving people feedback every which way. And I've instinctively recoiled when given negative feedback. And worse yet, I've sloughed off appreciative feedback and missed chances to feel really good about myself. I figure all this is what qualifies me as an expert and gives me the credibility to tell you how to do it right...or at least how not to screw it up. So here goes, in three parts. But first, I'd be remiss if I didn't say something about why feedback is so important.

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  • The Way You Think About Willpower Is Hurting You


    Not so long ago, my after work routine looked like this: After a particularly grueling day, I'd sit on the couch and veg for hours, doing my solo version of "Netflix and chill," which meant keeping company with a cold pint of ice cream. I knew the ice cream, and the sitting, were probably a bad idea, but I told myself this was my well-deserved "reward" for working so hard. Psychological researchers have a name for this phenomenon: it's called "ego depletion." The theory is that willpower is connected to a limited reserve of mental energy, and once you run out of that energy, you're more likely to lose self-control. This theory would seem to perfectly explain my after-work indulgences. But new studies suggest that we've been thinking about willpower all wrong, and that the theory of ego depletion isn't true. Even worse, holding on to the idea that willpower is a limited resource can actually be bad for you, making you more likely to lose control and act against your better judgement.

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  • We are largely debt-free and our business model ensures we remain this way: Anoop Kumar Mittal, CMD, NBCC


    NBCC (India's) current order book is at about Rs 80,000 crore. It was recently in the news for winning an order worth Rs 2,000 crore to build convention centres in nine different African countries. Moreover, NBCC also expects a mega high-profile contract for redeveloping Mumbai's Dharavi area, Asia's largest slum, into a modern mini-town within Mumbai. Anoop Kumar Mittal, CMD, NBCC, talks to Tradebriefs about the company's business model and growth plans.

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  • How do you measure leadership?


    Are you a good leader? How do you know? In a startup culture that is obsessed with management by metrics, many founders struggle to answer this critical question about themselves. It's tempting to measure leaders simply by the success of their businesses. But even the most successful founders know how much timing and luck can be confounding factors in this approach. Measuring leadership through bottom-line company performance also fails to provide any clues as to how someone can improve as a leader. So is there a better way?

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