Monday 6th July 2020
  • Keeping fit: how to do the right exercise for your age

    The effect of exercise on health is profound. It can protect you from a range of conditions, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. But the type and amount of exercise you should do changes as you age. To ensure that you are doing the right type of exercise for your age, follow this simple guide.

    Childhood and adolescence
    In childhood, exercise helps control body weight, builds healthy bones and promotes self-confidence and healthy sleep patterns. The government recommends that children should get at least one hour of exercise a day.

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  • The Philosopher Who Says We Should Play God

    Australian bioethicist Julian Savulescu has a knack for provocation. Take human cloning. He says most of us would readily accept it if it benefited us. As for eugenics - creating smarter, stronger, more beautiful babies - he believes we have an ethical obligation to use advanced technology to select the best possible children.

    A protege of the philosopher Peter Singer, Savulescu is a prominent moral philosopher at the University of Oxford, where he directs the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. He also edits the Journal of Medical Ethics. Savulescu isn’t shy about stepping onto ethical minefields. He sees nothing wrong with doping to help cyclists climb those steep mountains in the Tour de France. Some elite athletes will always cheat to boost their performance, so instead of trying to enforce rules that will be broken, he claims we’d be better off with a system that allows low-dose doping.

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  • The Ultimate Rich Kids Were the Children of Famous Explorers

    In 1523, Diego Colon, the eldest son of the man known as Cristobal Colon - whom the United States calls Christopher Columbus - crossed the Atlantic Ocean for the last time, called back by the Spanish crown to answer for his actions in "New Spain." Since his father had died, in 1506, Diego had been fighting to claim the wealth and power he believed he was owed, that Spain had promised his family.

    He had managed to win the support of Charles V, the most recent king, but after Diego raised taxes in Hispaniola and invested in slavery and sugar plantations, the new king had started to see him as a rebel. For decades, the monarchy and the Colon family had been caught in a legal battle, a battle that would stretch on for centuries, over the wealth ripped from the "New World" - the labor of the people in colonized lands, the natural resources, and a share of the tax revenue sent back to Spain. Diego wanted more of it than, in practice, the monarchy was willing to hand over.

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  • 7 Strange Questions that can help you find your life purpose

    Part of the problem is the concept of "life purpose" itself. The idea that we were each born for some higher purpose and it's now our cosmic mission to find it. This is the same kind of shitty logic used to justify things like spirit crystals or that your lucky number is 34 (but only on Tuesdays or during full moons).

    Here's the truth. We exist on this earth for some undetermined period of time. During that time we do things. Some of these things are important. Some of them are unimportant. And those important things give our lives meaning and happiness. The unimportant ones basically just kill time.

    So when people say, "What should I do with my life?" or "What is my life purpose?" what they're actually asking is: "What can I do with my time that is important?"

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  • The Nine Habits to Increase Your Energy

    Energy, not time, is the basis for productivity. Having all the hours in the day won't help you if you're exhausted for most of it.

    Your habits define your energy levels. If you have good habits, you'll feel energized and be more resilient to burn out, both physically and mentally. If your habits are misaligned, you can get into a cycle where you feel worse and worse, until your it's a struggle just to keep up.

    Here are nine habits you can work on this year to increase your energy levels.

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  • How to Achieve Your Goals By Creating an Enemy

    DJ Khaled, the one-man internet meme, is known for warning his tens of millions of social media followers about a group of villains he calls "they."

    "They don't want you motivated. They don't want you inspired," he blares on camera. "They don't want you to win," he warns. On Ellen DeGeneres's talk show, Khaled urged the host, "Please, Ellen, stay away from them!"

    The "they" Khaled invokes are clearly a sinister force. But who are they? Khaled offered clues when he told DeGeneres, "They are the people who don't believe in you... They is the person that told you you would never have an Ellen show."

    Although Khaled's claims may seem outlandish, he is in fact leveraging a powerful psychological hack: scapegoating.

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  • There's a dark side to meditation that no one talks about

    We've all heard about the benefits of meditation ad nauseam. Those disciplined enough to practice regularly are rewarded with increased control over the brainwaves known as alpha rhythms, which leads to better focus and may help ease pain. In addition to calming the mind and body, meditation can also reduce the markers of stress in people with anxiety disorders. Rigorous studies have backed health claims such as these to convince therapists, physicians, and corporate gurus to embrace meditation's potential.

    What contemporary and ancient meditators have always known, however, is that while the hype may be warranted, the practice is not all peace, love, and blissful glimpses of unreality. Sitting zazen, gazing at their third eye, a person can encounter extremely unpleasant emotions and physical or mental disturbances.

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  • The 'masculine mystique'- why men can't ditch the baggage of being a bloke

    Far from embracing the school run, most men are still trapped by rigid cultural notions of being strong, dominant and successful. Is it leading to an epidemic of unhappiness similar to the one felt by Betty Friedan's 50s housewives?

    Back in the 90s, it was all going to be so different. Not for our generation the lopsided approach of our parents, with their quaint postwar notions of father-breadwinners and mother-homemakers. We would be equal; interchangeable. Our young women would run companies, embassies, hospitals and schools, while our young men, no slouches themselves, would punctuate their careers with long, halcyon spells dandling babies and teaching toddlers how to make tiny volcanoes out of vinegar and baking soda.

    That equality would have formidable knock-on effects. The gender pay gap would narrow. Sexual harassment wouldn't disappear, but decoupling professional power from gender would do a lot to erase it from the workplace.

    A generation or so later, it is clear: this is the revolution that never happened.

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  • Motivating Employees Is Not About Carrots or Sticks

    Motivating employees seems like it should be easy. And it is - in theory. But while the concept of motivation may be straightforward, motivating employees in real-life situations is far more challenging. As leaders, we're asked to understand what motivates each individual on our team and manage them accordingly. What a challenging ask of leaders, particularly those with large or dispersed teams and those who are already overwhelmed by their own workloads.

    Leaders are also encouraged to rely on the carrot versus stick approach for motivation, where the carrot is a reward for compliance and the stick is a consequence for noncompliance. But when our sole task as leaders becomes compliance, trying to compel others to do something, chances are we're the only ones who will be motivated.

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  • Do not assume US still aspires to be a world leader, Merkel warns

    The rest of the world can no longer take it for granted that the US still aspires to be a global leader and needs to readjust its priorities accordingly, Angela Merkel has warned.

    "We grew up in the certain knowledge that the United States wanted to be a world power," the German chancellor said in an interview with a group of six European newspapers.

    "Should the US now wish to withdraw from that role of its own free will, we would have to reflect on that very deeply."

    Merkel, the first German leader to have grown up on the eastern side of the iron curtain, has in the past frequently spoken of her admiration for the US's global influence. When she spoke in front of Congress in 2009, Merkel rhapsodised about the "incredible gift of freedom" bestowed on eastern Germans with the US-supported toppling of the Berlin Wall.

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